Suggested Course Sequence

Undergraduate Program

Toxicology - Major

Year 1

Description: An introduction to the underlying fundamental aspects of living systems: covering cell biology, genetics and the evolutionary processes which lead to complex, multi-cellular life forms.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L-3P)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Biology

Prerequisite(s): Biology 30 or BIOL 107 or BIOL 108.

Note: Chemistry 30 is strongly recommended. Students with credit for BIOL 110 will not receive credit for BIOL 120.

Description: Our world has at least 15 million species, all of which have adapted to particular environments and lifestyles and use energy to grow and reproduce. We examine these processes in representative organisms from all the major groups, and discuss factors influencing changes in biodiversity over time and space.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L-3P)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Biology

Prerequisite(s): Biology 30 or BIOL 107 or BIOL 108.

Note: Students with credit for BIOL 110 will not receive credit for BIOL 121.

Description: Structure, bonding and properties of materials. Topics include atoms and molecules, bonding, molecular structure, intermolecular forces, states of matter, and properties of materials. The laboratory illustrates material covered in the lectures.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L-3.5P)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Chemistry

Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 30 and (Mathematics B30 or Foundations of Mathematics 30 or Pre-Calculus 30).

Note: Mathematics C30 or Geometry-Trigonometry 30 is strongly recommended. Students with credit for CHEM 111 or 114 may not take this course for credit

Description: Chemical reactions, including the rates and energetics of reactions and specific types of reactions. Topics include stoichiometry, chemical reactions, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, specific reactions, and thermodynamics.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L-3P)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Chemistry

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 111, 112 or 114.

Note: The introductory CHEM courses were changed in 2002. Students with credit for CHEM 111 may take CHEM 115.

Description: An introduction to organic chemistry; students will learn to name organic compounds, predict some of the properties and reactivity of compounds based on molecular structure, and grasp the importance of these concepts and their application to all sciences and life in general. Almost all the reactions in living matter involve organic compounds, and it is impossible to understand the molecular processes of living systems without knowing organic chemistry. CHEM 250.3 is intended as a basis for other courses, and a beginning for understanding organic and bio-organic chemistry. The laboratory will introduce students to basic chemical laboratory skills frequently used in organic chemistry.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L-3P-1T)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Chemistry

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 112 or 114.

Note: The introductory CHEM courses were changed in 2002. Students with credit for CHEM 111 may take CHEM 250. Students with credit for CHEM 251 may not take CHEM 250 for credit.

MATH 110: Calculus I

Description: Introduction to derivatives, limits, techniques of differentiation, maximum and minimum problems and other applications, implicit differentiation, anti-derivatives.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L-1.5P)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Mathematics and Statistics

Prerequisite(s): Mathematics B30 and C30; or Pre-Calculus 30; or MATH 102 or MATH 104.

Note: Students wishing to complete a full year of calculus should register for either MATH 112 or 116 for Term 2. At the completion of MATH 110, students will be allowed the option of changing their choice of the Term 2 course. Students may have credit for only one of MATH 110, 121, 123 or 125.


MATH 125: Mathematics for the Life Sciences

Description: An introduction to mathematical modeling with a focus on applications to the life sciences.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1(3L-1.5P)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Mathematics and Statistics

Prerequisite(s): Mathematics A30, B30 and C30; or Pre-Calculus 30; or MATH 102 or MATH 104.

Note: Students may receive credit for only one of MATH 110, 121, 123, or 125. Students with credit for MATH 115 may not take this course for credit. Arts & Science students needing 6 credit units of 100-level calculus should take MATH 110 followed by MATH 116. This course is restricted to students Majoring in Biology; Biology & Biotechnology; Anatomy & Cell Biology; Biochemistry; Biochemistry & Biotechnology; Biotechnology, Microbiology & Immunology; Environment & Society; Environmental Biology; Microbiology & Immunology; Physiology & Pharmacology; Toxicology; or Pharmacy.

6 credit units to fulfill Program Type C requirements
Electives to make a total of 30 credit units

Year 2

BIOL 224: Animal Body Systems/BMSC 224: Animal Body Systems

Description: Content ranges from Mendelian genetics to computational procedures based on the complete genome. Examples from eukaryotic species, including humans, are emphasized. Topics include classical transmission genetics, cytogenetics, DNA structure and replication, gene function, mutation and repair, regulation, recombinant DNA technology, and structural, functional and comparative genomics.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L-3P)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Biology

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120.

Note: BIOL 121 is strongly recommended. Students with credit for BIOL 211 will not receive credit for BIOL 226.


PHSI 208.6: Human Body Systems

Description: Introduces the major organ systems of the human body and how they work.

Credit units: .3

Formerly: HSC 208; PHSI 212

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120.3 and CHEM 112.3

Note: BMSC 200.3 is recommended.  Students with credit for HSC 208.6 will not receive credit for this course.  Students will be able to receive credit for both BIOL/BMSC 224.3 and PHSI 208.6 only if BIOL/BMSC 224.3 is completed first.  The two courses may not be taken concurrently.

Description: An introduction to the biology of eukaryotic cells. Topics include organization of eukaryotic chromosomes; the flow of genetic information from nucleus to cytoplasm; cellular membranes and organelles; control of cell division; and signaling between cells. Contrasts between eukaryotic cells and prokaryotic microbial cells will be discussed, as well as distinctions between plant and animal cells.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1(3L)

College: Medicine

Department: Medicine (Dean's Office)

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): BIOL 120, BMSC 200.

Note: Students with credit for ACB 200 will not receive credit for BMSC 220.

Description: Content ranges from Mendelian genetics to computational procedures based on the complete genome. Examples from eukaryotic species, including humans, are emphasized. Topics include classical transmission genetics, cytogenetics, DNA structure and replication, gene function, mutation and repair, regulation, recombinant DNA technology, and structural, functional and comparative genomics.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L-3P)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Biology

Formerly: BIOC 200.3

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120.

Note: BIOL 121 is strongly recommended. Students with credit for BIOL 211 will not receive credit for BIOL 226.

Description: This unique course provides an overview of the history of toxicology told through stories and case studies covering pivotal and transformative events and discoveries through time. Topics include high profile poisonings in ancient and modern times, natural poisons, classical examples of industrial and environmental pollution, current issues, and important discoveries that led to the development of the field of toxicology and the creation of national regulatory agencies and guidelines. The use of case studies provides students with exciting and memorable examples of how poisons and pollutants have changed history and had important influences at regional, national and international scales. No previous knowledge of toxicology is required. 

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L-3P)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Toxicology Centre

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units of university courses

Note: No previous knowledge of toxicology is required

6 credit units from PHYS 115.3 and PHYS 117.3 (or PHYS125.3)
3 credit units from BIOL 226.3 (or ANBI 420.3) or BIOL 228.3 (or PLSC 213.3)
3 credit units to fulfill Program Type C requirements
Electives to make a total of 30 credit units

Year 3

Description: The disposal and treatment of waste materials will be discussed in terms of their effect on the gaseous and aqueous environments. A series of problems designed to illustrate the material covered in each topic will be assigned. The laboratory sessions are designed to give some understanding of how tests for environmental quality are carried out in the field and in the laboratory.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L-3P)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Chemistry

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 115

BIOL 317: Fundamentals of Animal Physiology

Description: Considers physical, chemical and functional aspects of animal cells and tissues. Specifically examines membrane transport mechanisms, bioelectricity and fundamental principles of muscle and nervous system physiology, evolution and plasticity. Cellular mechanisms underlying learning and memory are introduced.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1(3L-4P)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Biology

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 224 or BMSC 224 (or HSC 208); CHEM 112; CHEM 115 or CHEM 250 (CHEM 115 recommended).

Note: PHYS 115 and 117 are recommended. Students with credit for BIOL 217 will not receive credit for this course. Offered on an annual basis.


PHSI 208.6: Human Body Systems

Description: Introduces the major organ systems of the human body and how they work.

Credit units: .3

Formerly: HSC 208; PHSI 212

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120.3 and CHEM 112.3

Note: BMSC 200.3 is recommended.  Students with credit for HSC 208.6 will not receive credit for this course.  Students will be able to receive credit for both BIOL/BMSC 224.3 and PHSI 208.6 only if BIOL/BMSC 224.3 is completed first.  The two courses may not be taken concurrently.

Description: An introduction to the general principles of toxicology. Salient topics include: dose-response relationships, toxicokinetics, target toxicity, mechanisms of toxic action, general principles of toxicity testing, and mechanisms of action of antidotes.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1(3L)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Formerly: VBMS 300.

Prerequisite(s): BMSC 224.3/BIOL 224.3 or PHSI 208.6.

Note: Open to all students. Students with credit for VBMS 300 may not take this course for credit.

Description: A discussion of major environmental pollutants, their sources, interactions with atmospheric, terrestrial and aquatic systems, exposure of people, animals and other biota, and their dose-response relationships. Some of the physical and chemical changes induced in the environment by pollutants, contaminant fate and transport, and bioremediation are also discussed.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120 and 121, CHEM 112.

3 credit units from STAT 245.3 or STAT 246.3 or PLSC 214.33 credit units from the Toxicology list
3 credit units from BIOL 222.3 or 373.3 or BMSC 240.3
Remaining 3 credit units from BIOL 226.3 or BIOL 228.3 (or PLSC 213.3)
6 credit units to fulfill Program Type C requirements
Electives to make a total of 30 credit units

Year 4

Description: This course provides students with the knowledge and tools required to design, evaluate and interpret toxicological studies. Students will learn how to identify putative causes of adverse effects, design experiments to evaluate these causes and how to estimate, and communicate about, how toxicant concentrations are linked to adverse effects. The course will include test designs at the organism, population and ecological levels of organization by using examples drawn from human and ecological toxicological disciplines. At the conclusion of this course, students will have gained an understanding of how human and ecological toxicity tests are designed, interpreted and communicated.

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300, TOX 301; and one of STAT 245, STAT 246 or PLSC 214.

Description: Seminar presentations by visitors, faculty and students on a broad selection of toxicology issues. Fourth-year students in the Undergraduate Toxicology Program will be required to present one seminar and attend all seminars throughout the full academic year.

Credit units: .0

Term description: 1&2(1S)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300 and 301.

Electives to make a total of 30 credit units.

Choose 18 credit units from the following:

Description: This course will provide an overview of the sources, fate and effects of toxicants in the aquatic environment. Material will center around prevailing issues reported in the popular news media associated with modern and legacy contaminants, and will illustrate how laboratory and field testing can be combined to assess and predict effects on organisms.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120.3, BIOL 121.3 and CHEM 112.3.

Description: Discusses natural and artificially produced radionuclides, units of radiation measurement, processes of decay and fission, interaction of radiation with matter, doses, risks of effects, and radionuclide transfer through ecosystems. Provides students with the knowledge to assess potential environmental impacts and health hazards from exposure to ionizing radiation from natural background, uranium mining and medical courses. A 2 hour tutorial once a week is included.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L-2T)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120; BIOL 121; and CHEM 112 or PHYS 115.

Description: Covers the sources, types, behavior and toxic effects of major air pollutants. It is based on four units: 1) atmospheric structure, evolution, energy balance and circulation; 2) major classes of air pollutants (including indoor air quality concerns), environmental behavior and effects; 3) the respiratory system as a target for toxic agents, mechanisms of damage and repair, assessment of respiratory function and standardized inhalation toxicity testing; and 4) students debates on current topics in air pollution and inhalation Toxicology.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120.3, BIOL 121.3, CHEM 112.3, and CHEM 115.3

Description: An introduction to human health and ecological risk assessment and an overview of Canadian and international regulatory requirements for the registration of new products, focussing on safety assessment/toxicity testing of pesticides and human pharmaceuticals, and basic principles of occupational health and industrial hygiene.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units BIOL and 6 credit units CHEM.

Note: TOX 300 and TOX 301 recommended.

Description: An overview of the types of injury produced in specific vertebrate, especially mammalian, organ systems by toxic agents and how such injury alters their functions and the overall effect on the body.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300.

Description: An overview of the occurrence, mechanisms of action and clinical effects of commonly encountered plant toxins, mycotoxins, poisonous mushrooms, algal toxins, bacterial toxins, and zootoxins (venomous and poisonous snakes, fish, arthropods, and marine invertebrates).

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300.

Description: An introduction to major categories, sources, routes of exposure, metabolism, mechanisms of action and toxic effects on people and ecosystems of common industrial organic chemicals, pesticides and metals. Emphasis will be placed on pollutants and industries of relevance to Canada.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300.

Note: TOX 301 recommended.

Description: Provides students an opportunity to evaluate practical toxicology/ecotoxicology problems associated with Saskatchewan and northern ecosystems. Students will be presented with specific toxicological questions or case studies of current relevance which will be examined using research data and library facilities. Written and oral presentations will be required for each problem.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(1L-2S/T)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300 and 301.

TOX 480: Toxicology Research

Description: Students will work on a laboratory, field, library, or theoretical study under the supervision of a faculty member from the Toxicology Group. Each individual project requires approval of a research proposal by the Toxicology Academic Advisor in the term preceding registration before permission will be granted. A thorough, written report in thesis format describing the project and the summarized results submitted at the end of the project will be evaluated by the supervisor.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(6P)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Permission of the department required.

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300 and 301.
Note: Students with credit for TOX 481 may not take this course for credit. This course is only open to Honours students in the fourth year of their Toxicology program, unless special permission has been granted by the Toxicology Academic Advisor.

TOX 481: Toxicology Research

Description: Students will work on a toxicology research project under the supervision of a faculty member from the Toxicology Group. Each project requires approval of a research proposal by the Toxicology Academic Advisor prior to registration. A written report in thesis format must be submitted at the end of the project.

Credit units: .6

Term description: 1&2(6P)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Permission of the department required.

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300 and 301.

Note: Students with credit for TOX 480 may not take this course for credit. This course is only open to Honours students in the fourth year of their Toxicology program, unless special permission has been granted by the Toxicology Academic Advisor.

Description: An overview of the occurrence, mechanisms of action and clinical effects of commonly encountered plant toxins, mycotoxins, poisonous mushrooms, algal toxins, bacterial toxins, and zootoxins (venomous and poisonous snakes, fish, arthropods, and marine invertebrates).

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300.

Description: An introduction to the principles of ecological toxicology, including: population modeling, experimental design and interpretation of field studies, and contaminant impact assessment on populations, communities and ecosystems. Computer laboratory exercises will be used to model populations and ecosystems and analyze changes in populations and communities resulting from contaminant impacts.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L-3P)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Biology

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120 and 121 (formerly BIOL 110) and BIOL 228 (formerly BIOL 253) and 6 additional credit units of senior BIOL courses and a course in statistics; or permission of the instructor.

Note: TOX 301 is recommended.

Description: A practical and theoretical introduction to environmental and socioeconomic impact assessment. Emphasis is placed on the principles and characteristics of impact assessment as set out under Canadian and Saskatchewan guidelines and legislation, and on the lessons learned from selected case studies.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Geography and Planning

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 280 or permission of the instructor.

Description: In this lecture/practicum based course, students will learn how to construct a multi-media environmental model using freely available software. Students will be exposed to the fundamental theory of environmental fate modeling with a focus on how contaminant movement and transformation in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and geosphere are incorporated into long term environmental fate models. The course is located in a computer lab and the emphasis is on practical construction, implementation and interpretation of fugacity based environmental fate models. Each lecture period consists of a brief theoretical overview followed by application and implementation of the equations into the student¿s fate model.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1(3L)

College: Agriculture and Bioresources

Department: Soil Science

Prerequisite(s): MATH 104, 110 or 125; PHYS 115 or EVSC 210; successful completion of 60 credit units of university level courses

Description: This course will focus on how contaminated sites are managed and remediated for new land uses. Students will learn the theory of how sites are investigated and characterized, how toxicological information is used to estimate the risk to humans and ecosystems, how threats to groundwater are assessed and finally, methods by which these risks and threats are mitigated through remediation approaches. This course will provide students with the skill sets necessary to assess, manage and reduce human and ecological risk at a contaminated site.

Prerequisite(s): EVSC 210 or 3 credit units 100-level PHYS, STAT 245 or PLSC 214, and one of EVSC 220, SLSC 240 or RRM 215.

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): One of TOX 321, GEOG 386, BLE 481, SLSC 313 or SLSC 322.

Note: Fourth-year students in Environmental Engineering or Toxicology will be given a prerequisite waiver by the college.

Toxicology - Minor

Requirements

Courses listed under the 'C6 Major Requirement' of the student's program Major cannot be used to meet requirements for the Minor.

Description: An introduction to the general principles of toxicology. Salient topics include: dose-response relationships, toxicokinetics, target toxicity, mechanisms of toxic action, general principles of toxicity testing, and mechanisms of action of antidotes.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1(3L)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Formerly: VBMS 300.

Prerequisite(s): BMSC 224.3/BIOL 224.3 or PHSI 208.6.

Note: Open to all students. Students with credit for VBMS 300 may not take this course for credit

Description: A discussion of major environmental pollutants, their sources, interactions with atmospheric, terrestrial and aquatic systems, exposure of people, animals and other biota, and their dose-response relationships. Some of the physical and chemical changes induced in the environment by pollutants, contaminant fate and transport, and bioremediation are also discussed.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120 and 121 and CHEM 112.

Restricted Electives

Choose 9 credit units from the following:

Description: This unique course provides an overview of the history of toxicology told through stories and case studies covering pivotal and transformative events and discoveries through time. Topics include high profile poisonings in ancient and modern times, natural poisons, classical examples of industrial and environmental pollution, current issues, and important discoveries that led to the development of the field of toxicology and the creation of national regulatory agencies and guidelines. The use of case studies provides students with exciting and memorable examples of how poisons and pollutants have changed history and had important influences at regional, national and international scales. No previous knowledge of toxicology is required. 

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L-3P)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Toxicology Centre

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units of university courses

Note: No previous knowledge of toxicology is required

Description: This course will provide an overview of the sources, fate and effects of toxicants in the aquatic environment. Material will center around prevailing issues reported in the popular news media associated with modern and legacy contaminants, and will illustrate how laboratory and field testing can be combined to assess and predict effects on organisms.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120.3, BIOL 121.3 and CHEM 112.3.

Description: Discusses natural and artificially produced radionuclides, units of radiation measurement, processes of decay and fission, interaction of radiation with matter, doses, risks of effects, and radionuclide transfer through ecosystems. Provides students with the knowledge to assess potential environmental impacts and health hazards from exposure to ionizing radiation from natural background, uranium mining and medical courses. A 2 hour tutorial once a week is included.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L-2T)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120; BIOL 121; and CHEM 112 or PHYS 115.

Description: Covers the sources, types, behavior and toxic effects of major air pollutants. It is based on four units: 1) atmospheric structure, evolution, energy balance and circulation; 2) major classes of air pollutants (including indoor air quality concerns), environmental behavior and effects; 3) the respiratory system as a target for toxic agents, mechanisms of damage and repair, assessment of respiratory function and standardized inhalation toxicity testing; and 4) students debates on current topics in air pollution and inhalation Toxicology.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120.3, BIOL 121.3, CHEM 112.3, and CHEM 115.3

Description: An introduction to human health and ecological risk assessment and an overview of Canadian and international regulatory requirements for the registration of new products, focussing on safety assessment/toxicity testing of pesticides and human pharmaceuticals, and basic principles of occupational health and industrial hygiene.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units BIOL and 6 credit units CHEM.

Note: TOX 300 and TOX 301 recommended.

Description: This course provides students with the knowledge and tools required to design, evaluate and interpret toxicological studies. Students will learn how to identify putative causes of adverse effects, design experiments to evaluate these causes and how to estimate, and communicate about, how toxicant concentrations are linked to adverse effects. The course will include test designs at the organism, population and ecological levels of organization by using examples drawn from human and ecological toxicological disciplines. At the conclusion of this course, students will have gained an understanding of how human and ecological toxicity tests are designed, interpreted and communicated.

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300, TOX 301; and one of STAT 245, STAT 246 or PLSC 214.

Description: An overview of the types of injury produced in specific vertebrate, especially mammalian, organ systems by toxic agents and how such injury alters their functions and the overall effect on the body.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300.

Description: An overview of the occurrence, mechanisms of action and clinical effects of commonly encountered plant toxins, mycotoxins, poisonous mushrooms, algal toxins, bacterial toxins, and zootoxins (venomous and poisonous snakes, fish, arthropods, and marine invertebrates).

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300.

Description: An introduction to major categories, sources, routes of exposure, metabolism, mechanisms of action and toxic effects on people and ecosystems of common industrial organic chemicals, pesticides and metals. Emphasis will be placed on pollutants and industries of relevance to Canada.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300.

Note: TOX 301 recommended.

Description: Provides students an opportunity to evaluate practical toxicology/ecotoxicology problems associated with Saskatchewan and northern ecosystems. Students will be presented with specific toxicological questions or case studies of current relevance which will be examined using research data and library facilities. Written and oral presentations will be required for each problem.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(1L-2S/T)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300 and 301.

Choose 9 credit units from the following:

Description: This unique course provides an overview of the history of toxicology told through stories and case studies covering pivotal and transformative events and discoveries through time. Topics include high profile poisonings in ancient and modern times, natural poisons, classical examples of industrial and environmental pollution, current issues, and important discoveries that led to the development of the field of toxicology and the creation of national regulatory agencies and guidelines. The use of case studies provides students with exciting and memorable examples of how poisons and pollutants have changed history and had important influences at regional, national and international scales. No previous knowledge of toxicology is required. 

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L-3P)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Toxicology Centre

Prerequisite(s): 18 credit units of university courses

Note: No previous knowledge of toxicology is required

BIOL 224: Animal Body Systems

Description: Content ranges from Mendelian genetics to computational procedures based on the complete genome. Examples from eukaryotic species, including humans, are emphasized. Topics include classical transmission genetics, cytogenetics, DNA structure and replication, gene function, mutation and repair, regulation, recombinant DNA technology, and structural, functional and comparative genomics.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L-3P)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Biology

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120.

Note: BIOL 121 is strongly recommended. Students with credit for BIOL 211 will not receive credit for BIOL 226.


BMSC 224: Animal Body Systems

Description: Studies the problems all animals have to overcome in order to survive and reproduce, and the different body systems that must deal with both unique and common environmental challenges.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L-3P)

College: Medicine

Department: Medicine (Dean's Office)

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120.

Note: Students with credit for BIOL 203 or BIOL 217 or BIOL 224 or HSC 208 or PHSI 208 will not receive credit for BMSC 224.

Description: Provides students with a greater understanding of the complexity of important concepts and issues related to the land and environment of the North. The course focuses on the impacts of ecological and physical changes of northern ecosystems on the peoples. Emphasis is given to the challenges of sustainability of ecosystems in the Circumpolar North, and to the need for long-term and international stewardship.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 2(3L)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Biology

Prerequisite(s): NRTH 101 and 6 credit units in Science (BIOL 107, 108, 120 and 121 recommended).

Note: Students enrolled in a B.Sc. Four Year, Three-year or Honours in Biology can use BIOL 312 only to fulfill degree requirement #7 of the B.Sc. This course meets the science requirement for Programs A, B, D.

Description: Introduction to the ecology of lakes. The biological, chemical and physical properties of lakes are examined at lake and watershed levels. Theoretical and applied topics, including human impacts (e.g., eutrophication, climate change, ultraviolet radiation, contaminants, and angling) are examined. Laboratories and field trips provide training in limnological techniques.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1(3L-4P)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Biology

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 121, BIOL 228 (formerly BIOL 253) and CHEM 112; or permission of the instructor.

Note: A course in statistics is recommended. Students with credit for BIOL 415 may not take this course for credit. There will be costs for a field trip in addition to tuition fees.

Description: An introduction to the principles of ecological toxicology, including: population modeling, experimental design and interpretation of field studies, and contaminant impact assessment on populations, communities and ecosystems. Computer laboratory exercises will be used to model populations and ecosystems and analyze changes in populations and communities resulting from contaminant impacts.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L-3P)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Biology

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120 and 121 (formerly BIOL 110) and BIOL 228 (formerly BIOL 253) and 6 additional credit units of senior BIOL courses and a course in statistics; or permission of the instructor.

Note: TOX 301 is recommended.

Description: The disposal and treatment of waste materials will be discussed in terms of their effect on the gaseous and aqueous environments. A series of problems designed to illustrate the material covered in each topic will be assigned. The laboratory sessions are designed to give some understanding of how tests for environmental quality are carried out in the field and in the laboratory.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L-3P)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Chemistry

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 115.

Description: A multidisciplinary study of the biophysical environments of the circumpolar North. Examines the processes operating at the Earth's surface and within the atmosphere and hydrosphere and their role in structuring northern ecosystems. Writing exercises and/or research projects will permit students with background preparation in the humanities, social sciences and the sciences to assess the impact of human activity on northern environments.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Geography and Planning

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units in science; or permission of the instructor.

Note: GEOG 120 or NRTH 101 recommended.

Description: A practical and theoretical introduction to environmental and socioeconomic impact assessment. Emphasis is placed on the principles and characteristics of impact assessment as set out under Canadian and Saskatchewan guidelines and legislation, and on the lessons learned from selected case studies.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Geography and Planning

Prerequisite(s): GEOG 280 or permission of the instructor

Description: In this lecture/practicum based course, students will learn how to construct a multi-media environmental model using freely available software. Students will be exposed to the fundamental theory of environmental fate modeling with a focus on how contaminant movement and transformation in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and geosphere are incorporated into long term environmental fate models. The course is located in a computer lab and the emphasis is on practical construction, implementation and interpretation of fugacity based environmental fate models. Each lecture period consists of a brief theoretical overview followed by application and implementation of the equations into the student¿s fate model.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1(3L)

College: Agriculture and Bioresources

Department: Soil Science

Prerequisite(s): MATH 104, 110 or 125; PHYS 115 or EVSC 210; successful completion of 60 credit units of university level courses.

Description: This course will focus on how contaminated sites are managed and remediated for new land uses. Students will learn the theory of how sites are investigated and characterized, how toxicological information is used to estimate the risk to humans and ecosystems, how threats to groundwater are assessed and finally, methods by which these risks and threats are mitigated through remediation approaches. This course will provide students with the skill sets necessary to assess, manage and reduce human and ecological risk at a contaminated site.

Prerequisite(s): EVSC 210 or 3 credit units 100-level PHYS, STAT 245 or PLSC 214, and one of EVSC 220, SLSC 240 or RRM 215.

Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): One of TOX 321, GEOG 386, BLE 481, SLSC 313 or SLSC 322.

Note: Fourth-year students in Environmental Engineering or Toxicology will be given a prerequisite waiver by the college.

Description: This course will provide an overview of the sources, fate and effects of toxicants in the aquatic environment. Material will center around prevailing issues reported in the popular news media associated with modern and legacy contaminants, and will illustrate how laboratory and field testing can be combined to assess and predict effects on organisms.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120.3, BIOL 121.3 and CHEM 112.3.

Description: Discusses natural and artificially produced radionuclides, units of radiation measurement, processes of decay and fission, interaction of radiation with matter, doses, risks of effects, and radionuclide transfer through ecosystems. Provides students with the knowledge to assess potential environmental impacts and health hazards from exposure to ionizing radiation from natural background, uranium mining and medical courses. A 2 hour tutorial once a week is included.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L-2T)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120; BIOL 121; and CHEM 112 or PHYS 115.

Description: Covers the sources, types, behavior and toxic effects of major air pollutants. It is based on four units: 1) atmospheric structure, evolution, energy balance and circulation; 2) major classes of air pollutants (including indoor air quality concerns), environmental behavior and effects; 3) the respiratory system as a target for toxic agents, mechanisms of damage and repair, assessment of respiratory function and standardized inhalation toxicity testing; and 4) students debates on current topics in air pollution and inhalation toxicology.

Prerequisite(s): BIOL 120.3, BIOL 121.3, CHEM 112.3, and CHEM 115.3

Description: An introduction to human health and ecological risk assessment and an overview of Canadian and international regulatory requirements for the registration of new products, focussing on safety assessment/toxicity testing of pesticides and human pharmaceuticals, and basic principles of occupational health and industrial hygiene.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit units BIOL and 6 credit units CHEM.

Note: TOX 300 and TOX 301 recommended.

Description: This course provides students with the knowledge and tools required to design, evaluate and interpret toxicological studies. Students will learn how to identify putative causes of adverse effects, design experiments to evaluate these causes and how to estimate, and communicate about, how toxicant concentrations are linked to adverse effects. The course will include test designs at the organism, population and ecological levels of organization by using examples drawn from human and ecological toxicological disciplines. At the conclusion of this course, students will have gained an understanding of how human and ecological toxicity tests are designed, interpreted and communicated.

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300, TOX 301; and one of STAT 245, STAT 246 or PLSC 214.

Description: An overview of the types of injury produced in specific vertebrate, especially mammalian, organ systems by toxic agents and how such injury alters their functions and the overall effect on the body.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300.

Description: An overview of the occurrence, mechanisms of action and clinical effects of commonly encountered plant toxins, mycotoxins, poisonous mushrooms, algal toxins, bacterial toxins, and zootoxins (venomous and poisonous snakes, fish, arthropods, and marine invertebrates).

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300.

Description: An introduction to major categories, sources, routes of exposure, metabolism, mechanisms of action and toxic effects on people and ecosystems of common industrial organic chemicals, pesticides and metals. Emphasis will be placed on pollutants and industries of relevance to Canada.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(3L)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300.

Note: TOX 301 recommended.

Description: Provides students an opportunity to evaluate practical toxicology/ecotoxicology problems associated with Saskatchewan and northern ecosystems. Students will be presented with specific toxicological questions or case studies of current relevance which will be examined using research data and library facilities. Written and oral presentations will be required for each problem.

Credit units: .3

Term description: 1/2(1L-2S/T)

College: Arts and Science

Department: Science Division

Prerequisite(s): TOX 300 and 301.